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Tag Archives: Crafts

Make a Civil War Quilt

Since I love vintage quilts and am also a Civil War buff, it was a delight to discover this display at the Davenport, Florida quilt show. Here’s their vendor’s booth at the show.

The Worn Threads display at the Davenport, Florida quilt show.

The Worn Threads display at the Davenport, Florida quilt show.

You can order their quilt kits online. They take special care selecting the fabrics with the right colors and feel for the 1860 era. You can see the results look fabulous. Instant heirloom to pass along in your family.

Make your own authentic looking quilt with a Worn Threads kit. It will look like your great-great grandmother made it during the Civil War.

Make your own authentic looking quilt with a Worn Threads kit. It will look like your great-great grandmother made it during the Civil War.

If you’re interested in history or genealogy, check out my blog: Finding Your Civil War Ancestor.

 
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Posted by on November 16, 2014 in Civil War, Crafts

 

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Expanding a Craft Tutorial

If the article has photos, the visitor to your page can see how the craft is made. Still you need to make the text as clear as possible so there is no confusion.

Some sites have a minimum word count. Wordiness is not the goal. Clarity and thoroughness of the instructions is what is wanted. Make every word useful to the reader. See the examples below.

Check each step. How could it be clearer? Pretend the reader is a beginning crafter and add information for them. If the step says “glue X to Z,” you can give more detail. Tell what kind of glue to use. Does it need to be in a well-ventilated area? How long should it dry? Adding this level of detail helps your reader.

When the instructions say “use XYZ,” expand it to tell the reader where they can get the supplies if they are anything unusual. You can offer alternate materials or mention a preferred brand that you think works best. Example: Use brown paper bags to cover the base. If you don’t have those, use brown construction paper or brown wrapping paper.

If the INTRODUCTION merely says “Here’s an easy way to make XYZ,” then you are skimping the reader. This is the place to tell the origin of the craft, how you learned to make it, why they will want to make it and any background information you know. Example: My sister made these for all of us. Everyone loved them. I’ve changed it a little, to make it easier. They make great gifts for a club or office gift exchange.

Insert a step at the beginning to explain the supplies needed. Give tips for selecting the right materials and tools for the project.

Add a step at the end telling how the finished craft project can be used or displayed. Tell how to take care of it (is it washable?).

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Posted by on May 9, 2013 in Crafting

 

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Seashells and Summer Memories

We all do it; pick up a pretty shell at the beach and take it home to remember the magical time at the beach. Unfortunately once we have the seashell at home, we’re puzzled about what to do with it.

My friend, Sandy Bassett arranges her shells, some sand and other beach artifacts in a pretty, clear glass bowl. It looks fabulous on a table or shelf. I’ve built a webpage to show off her method of using those seashells. I’ve also included other crafty ideas from artists and even Martha Stewart.

Check them out and you’ll be pulling those seashells out of the drawer or the shoebox where they’re stashed. One of the most popular ideas on the webpage is filling the clear-glass base of a lamp with shells.

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2010 in Crafts, Home, Squidoo

 

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Portraits in Fabric

I happened to catch an exhibit at the Springvale Public Library in Maine of quilted, collage work.  The artist lives in Kennebunkport and she used old photos of family and friends in the quilted pieces.  She transferred the photo to fabric, then assembled pieces around it and added beads, vintage lace and other odds and ends to complement the photo.  Simply beautiful.collage quilt piece

The people featured in the miniature quilts are local to Southern Maine and part of the Franco-American community in this area.  My husband recognized some of the names from growing up in the area.

Yvette Therrien Demko 1951

The artist’s name is Claire Unsinn of Kennebunk, Maine. Her maiden name was Bergeron and she grew up in Springvale in the 1950s and 1960s.

 
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Posted by on August 2, 2009 in Crafting, Crafts, New England

 

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How to Meet Minimum Word Count (eHow Craft Articles)

By Virginia Allain, eHow Member Rating

Writing about crafts Writing about crafts

Rate: (10 Ratings)

When you write an eHow article explaining an easy craft, it might be short on words. You need about 150 words to have the article accepted. Here’s how to add to that word count without just adding fluff. 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy
Step1

You don’t want to just add filler just to get the extra words in an online article. Make every word useful to the reader. See the examples below. Wordiness is not the goal. Clarity and thoroughness of the instructions is what is wanted.

Step2

Check each step. How could it be clearer? Pretend the reader is a beginning crafter and add information for them. If the step says “glue X to Z,” you can give more detail. Tell what kind of glue to use. Does it need to be in a well-ventilated area? How long should it dry? Adding this level of detail helps your reader and boosts the word count.

Step3

When the instructions say “use XYZ,” expand it to tell the reader where they can get the supplies if they are anything unusual. You can offer alternate materials or mention a preferred brand that you think works best. Example: Use brown paper bags to cover the base. If you don’t have those, use brown construction paper or brown wrapping paper. (The example adds at least 17 more words than the original.)

Step4

If the INTRODUCTION merely says “Here’s an easy way to make XYZ,” then you are skimping the reader. This is the place to tell the origin of the craft, how you learned to make it, why they will want to make it and any background information you know. Example: My sister made these for all of us. Everyone loved them. I’ve changed it a little, to make it easier. They make great gifts for a club or office gift exchange. (The example adds 31 words to the article.)

Step5

Insert a step at the beginning to explain the supplies needed. Give tips for selecting the right materials and tools for the project.

Step6

Add a step at the end telling how the finished craft project can be used or displayed. Tell how to take care of it (is it washable?).

Comments  from eHow readers
temari said
 Great tips. Thanks!

dove357 said

 You’re right-a beginner needs more questions answered than someone who has been crafting for years.

blingaling said

 Thoughtful suggestions for adding length without fluff.
Great article, sometimes we take it for granted that everyone else know where to find supplies. It’s also better to give too many details than not enough. 5*

Tfurby said

Great tips, thanks for the advice!
 
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Posted by on July 9, 2009 in Crafts, eHow, Writing

 

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I Love Holidays

At the moment, I’m decorating the house for our annual St. Patrick’s Day party.  Before long, everyone will be in the mood for Easter.   Whatever the holiday, it gives a lift to our routine lives.  I think everyone loves holidays.

Here are my articles on eHow about the different holidays:

VALENTINE’S DAY

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

EASTER

HALLOWEEN

THANKSGIVING

CHRISTMAS

NEW YEAR

GENERAL HOLIDAY ARTICLES

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2009 in holidays

 

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Another Writing Challenge at eHow

This challenge requires twelve articles written between January 25 and January 31.  That’s seven days, so here’s my effort to meet the challenge.  I’ll add the articles to the list below as I finish them.

  1. How to Stop Biting My Nails
  2. How to Stop Bitching
  3. How to Tend the Flag in Golf
  4. How to Raise Money with a Friends of the Library Group
  5. How to Help a Library with a Friends of the Library Group
  6. How to Make Taco Salad the Easy Way
  7. How to Decide If Cataract Surgery Is for You
  8. How to Find Nationality of Last Names
  9. How to Make Library Book Displays for December
  10. How to Make Valentines from Altered Cards
  11. How to Use Walla Properly
  12. How to Make a Grandmother Happy

Wow, I’m done and it’s two days ahead of the deadline.  That was good practice, as I think the next challenge will be 13 articles in 7 days.  If you sample any of the articles, leave me a comment to let me know what you think.

 
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Posted by on January 28, 2009 in eHow, Uncategorized, Writing

 

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